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  • The Florist's Mistake

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    On opening his new store, a man received a bouquet of flowers. He became dismayed on reading the enclosed card, that it expressed "Deepest Sympathy". 
     While puzzling over the message, his telephone rang. It was the florist, apologizing for having sent the wrong card. 
     "Oh, it's alright." said the storekeeper. "I'm a businessman and I understand how these things can happen." 
     "But," added the florist, "I accidentally sent your card to a funeral party." 
     "Well, what did it say?" ask the storekeeper. " 
     "Congratulations on your new location'." was the reply. (Thanks to Christians United).

    Let’s face it—end-of-life planning isn’t fun. The topic can seem morose, depressing -- maybe even a little scary. But it’s also a critical aspect of managing your assets and protecting your family, which is why it’s surprising that nearly 6 out of 10 Americans are unprepared for the inevitable.
    According to a new Caring.com survey, only 42 percent of U.S. adults currently have estate planning documents such as a will or living trust. For those with children under the age of 18, the figure is even lower, with just 36 percent having an end-of-life plan in place.

    “I think many Americans avoid setting up a will because they simply don’t want to think about their death,” says Texas-based financial coach Craig Dacy. “However, setting up a will not only takes care of your loved ones financially, it can save them a lot of emotional stress after you’re gone."

    The study, conducted in January by Princeton Survey Research Associates International, asked 1,003 adults whether they currently have estate-planning documents in case of their death, as well as the reason why not (if applicable).

    Forty-seven percent of survey respondents without estate documents said, “I just haven’t gotten around to it.” This is unsurprising to experts, who say an aversion to end-of-life planning is not only rooted in fear but also procrastination.

    “This is the ‘I’m going to live forever’ theory. No one literally thinks that, but we all want to believe we are going to live until our 80s or 90s so we don’t think we need a will right now,” says Debbi King, author of “The ABC’s of Personal Finance”. 

    “This isn’t true, of course. We all have an expiration date and no one knows exactly when it will be. The best thing you can do for your loved ones is have a will now.”
    Jennifer
    Feb 11, 2018
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